Department of The Geographer

Army of the United States 1777-1783

Our Purpose

The purpose of the Department of the Geographer is to accurately portray a working interpretation of the Department during the period from 1777 to 1783 with the express goal of portraying the world of the Continental Army staff officer better than has been
achieved to date.


“A good geographer to Survey the Roads and take Sketches of the Country where the Army is to Act would be extremely useful… …I would beg leave to recommend Mr. Robt. Erskine…”

Head Quarters, Ramapough, Friday, June 30, 1780.

 

Our Vision

 The Department of the Geographer to the Army is the recreated mapmaking unit of General Washington’s Continental Army Staff. While a number of the unit’s members have expertise in military engineering, and may be called upon at various events to use that expertise, the Geographers should not be confused with military engineers. Engineers were trained in the construction and reduction of fortifications, while Geographers (cartographers, surveyors, or topographical engineers) specialized in reconnaissance, mapmaking, and surveying distances. In the Continental Army, military engineers were generally recruited from Europe, whereas the geographers were generally able to find skilled surveyors in the colonies.

    It is the goal of this unit to give an accurate, authentic representation of a Continental Army staff department, including proper clothing, equipment & instruments, and skills & knowledge of the geographers’ profession as well as the theatre of operations and campaigns within.

 

By the summer of 1777, George Washington had identified a definite weakness in the Army’s ability to produce adequate topographical data in order to plan and execute theater operations. In July of that year, Washington wrote to Congress

“A good geographer to Survey the Roads and take Sketches of the Country where the Army is to Act would be extremely useful… …I would beg leave to recommend Mr. Robt. Erskine…”

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Draughtsman

Draughtsmen use data collected by a surveyor to create a map using 18th century handwriting, symbols, colors and scale.


Chainmen

“Two men from General Hand’s and one from Stark’s brigades to be sent to Mr. Erskine or his Deputy immediately to serve as Chain bearers a few Weeks.​”

Chainmen use a 66 ft Gunter’s chain to measure distances.

Flagmen

Flagmen use highly visible flag staffs to mark the ends of measured lines and sighting points.

Join the Geographers


Contact Us

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Doug Noble
111 Gibb Zea guarding the officers quarters, Williamsburg Va.
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